5th Grade Science

5th Grade Science

Created
Mar 27, 2024 8:24 PM
Curriculum
NGSS

Topics

5-LS1-1 - Plant Requirements - Air and Water

Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.

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What should students learn? (Disciplinary Core Ideas) Plants acquire their material for growth chiefly from air and water.
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How should students learn it? (Science and Engineering Practices) Develop a model to describe phenomena.
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How should students think? (Crosscutting Concepts) In systems and system models. A system can be described in terms of its components and their interactions.

Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on the idea that matter that is not food (air, water, decomposed materials in soil) is changed by plants into matter that is food.

5-LS2-1 - Environmental Matter Cycling

Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.

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What should students learn? (Disciplinary Core Ideas) Matter cycles between the air and soil and among plants, animals, and microbes as these organisms live and die. Organisms obtain gases, and water, from the environment, and release waste matter (gas, liquid, or solid) back into the environment.
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How should students learn it? (Science and Engineering Practices) Develop a model to describe phenomena.
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How should students think? (Crosscutting Concepts) In energy and matter. Matter is transported into, out of, and within systems.

Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on developing an understanding of the importance of matter cycling in ecosystems. Students construct their own model to describe the cycling of matter.

5-ESS1-1 - Stellar Brightness and Distance

Support an argument that differences in the apparent brightness of the sun compared to other stars is due to their relative distances from the Earth.

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What should students learn? (Disciplinary Core Ideas) The sun is a star that appears larger and brighter than other stars because it is closer. Stars range greatly in their size and distance from Earth.
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How should students learn it? (Science and Engineering Practices) Support an argument with evidence, data, or a model.
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How should students think? (Crosscutting Concepts) In scale, proportion, and quantity. The sizes and distances involved with space systems can be enormous.

Clarification Statement: Students should understand that the apparent brightness of the sun and stars is a result of their relative distances from Earth.

5-ESS1-2 - Daily and Seasonal Sky Changes

Support an argument that the apparent changing of stars' location (constellations) in the night sky is due to the Earth's rotation.

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What should students learn? (Disciplinary Core Ideas) The stars' locations change in predictable patterns during the night, and from season to season, due to Earth's rotation.
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How should students learn it? (Science and Engineering Practices) Support an argument with evidence, data, or a model.
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How should students think? (Crosscutting Concepts) In patterns. Patterns can be used to predict phenomena.

Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on the understanding that the apparent movement of constellations is due to the Earth's rotation.

5-ESS2-1 - Earth Sphere Interactions

Develop a model using an example to describe ways the geosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and/or atmosphere interact.

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What should students learn? (Disciplinary Core Ideas) Earth’s major systems are the geosphere (solid and molten rock, soil, and sediments), the hydrosphere (water and ice), the atmosphere (air), and the biosphere (living things, including humans).
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How should students learn it? (Science and Engineering Practices) Develop a model to describe phenomena.
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How should students think? (Crosscutting Concepts) In systems and system models. A system can be described in terms of its components and their interactions.

Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on describing and graphically representing interactions between Earth's four spheres.

5-ESS2-2 - Water Availability and Distribution

Describe and graph the amounts and percentages of water and fresh water in various reservoirs to provide evidence about the distribution of water on Earth.

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What should students learn? (Disciplinary Core Ideas) Nearly all of Earth’s available water is in the ocean. Most fresh water is in glaciers or underground; only a tiny fraction is in streams, lakes, wetlands, and the atmosphere.
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How should students learn it? (Science and Engineering Practices) Use data to provide evidence.
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How should students think? (Crosscutting Concepts) In scale, proportion, and quantity. The sizes and distances involved with Earth's water systems can be vast.

Clarification Statement: Students should understand the distribution and importance of water on Earth.

5-ESS3-1 - Protecting Earth's Resources and Environment

Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment.

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What should students learn? (Disciplinary Core Ideas) Human activities in agriculture, industry, and everyday life have had major effects on the land, vegetation, streams, ocean, air, and even outer space. But individuals and communities are doing things to help protect Earth’s resources and environments.
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How should students learn it? (Science and Engineering Practices) Obtain and combine information to describe phenomena.
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How should students think? (Crosscutting Concepts) In cause and effect. Cause and effect relationships are routinely identified, tested, and used to explain change.

Clarification Statement: Students should understand the importance of protecting Earth's resources and environment and how communities can contribute to this.

5-PS1-1 - Particle Model of Matter

Develop a model to describe that matter is made of particles too small to be seen.

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What should students learn? (Disciplinary Core Ideas) Matter of any type can be subdivided into particles that are too small to see, but even then the matter still exists and can be detected by other means.
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How should students learn it? (Science and Engineering Practices) Develop a model to describe phenomena.
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How should students think? (Crosscutting Concepts) In scale, proportion, and quantity. Natural objects exist from the very small to the immensely large.

Clarification Statement: Students should understand that matter is composed of tiny particles that are too small to see.

5-PS1-2 - Conservation of Matter

Measure and graph quantities to provide evidence that regardless of the type of change that occurs when heating, cooling, or mixing substances, the total weight of matter is conserved.

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What should students learn? (Disciplinary Core Ideas) The amount (weight) of matter is conserved when it changes form, even in transitions in which it seems to vanish.
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How should students learn it? (Science and Engineering Practices) Use data to provide evidence.
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How should students think? (Crosscutting Concepts) In energy and matter. Matter is conserved because atoms are conserved in physical and chemical processes.

Clarification Statement: Students should understand that the total weight of matter remains constant, regardless of the changes it undergoes.

5-PS1-3 - Material Properties

Develop a model to describe how the total number of atoms does not change in a chemical reaction and thus mass is conserved.

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What should students learn? (Disciplinary Core Ideas) The total number of each type of atom is conserved, and thus the mass does not change.
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How should students learn it? (Science and Engineering Practices) Develop a model to describe phenomena.
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How should students think? (Crosscutting Concepts) In energy and matter. Matter is conserved because atoms are conserved in physical and chemical processes.

Clarification Statement: Students should understand that the total number of atoms remains constant in a chemical reaction.

5-PS1-4 - Mixing Substances

Develop a model to describe that matter is made of particles too small to be seen.

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What should students learn? (Disciplinary Core Ideas) Measurements of a variety of properties can be used to identify materials.
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How should students learn it? (Science and Engineering Practices) Develop a model to describe phenomena.
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How should students think? (Crosscutting Concepts) In scale, proportion, and quantity. Natural objects exist from the very small to the immensely large.

Clarification Statement: Students should understand that matter is composed of tiny particles that are too small to see.

5-PS2-1 - Earth's Gravitational Force

Support an argument that the gravitational force exerted by Earth on objects is directed down.

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What should students learn? (Disciplinary Core Ideas) The gravitational force of Earth acting on an object near Earth’s surface pulls that object toward the planet’s center.
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How should students learn it? (Science and Engineering Practices) Support an argument with evidence, data, or a model.
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How should students think? (Crosscutting Concepts) In cause and effect. Cause and effect relationships are routinely identified, tested, and used to explain change.

Clarification Statement: Students should understand that Earth's gravitational force pulls objects down toward its center.

5-PS3-1 - Food Energy from the Sun

Use models to describe that energy in animals’ food (used for body repair, growth, motion, and to maintain body warmth) was once energy from the sun.

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What should students learn? (Disciplinary Core Ideas) Food provides animals with the materials they need for body repair and growth and the energy they need to maintain body warmth and for motion.
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How should students learn it? (Science and Engineering Practices) Develop a model to describe phenomena.
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How should students think? (Crosscutting Concepts) In energy and matter. Energy can be transferred in various ways and between objects.

Clarification Statement: Students should understand that the energy in animals' food originally came from the sun.